Black Rhinoceros

Black rhinos are edgy and nervous animals. When disturbed, they are quick to flee, though they will confront an aggressor head-on, particularly if offspring are present. As a result, they are difficult to observe in the wild, and are fewer in number than white rhinos. Black rhinos can be identified by their triangular (rather than square) lip and the lack of a neck hump. Size: Shoulder height 1,6m; length 3m to 4m; weight 800kg to 1.4 tonnes; front horn up to 1,3m long. Distribution: Restricted to relict populations in a few reserves (highly endangered).

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Rhino Brain Size

The hippopotamus is found close to fresh water where it spends the majority of its day before emerging at night to graze. It is distantly related to the domestic pig.

Steenboks are one of seven small species of antelopes that operate in monogamous pairs. They usually graze by day but will raid crops by night with astonishing stealth.

The hippopotamus is found close to fresh water where it spends the majority of its day before emerging at night to graze. It is distantly related to the domestic pig.

The world's fastest land mammal, cheetahs can reach speeds over 105km/h, but become exhausted after a few hundred metres and therefore stalk prey to within 60m before unleashing their tremendous acceleration. On average, only one in four hunts is successful.

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© Lonely Planet Publications 76

Zebras are dependent on water and are rarely found more than an easy day's walk away. Lions converge on water holes to lay ambushes. Single lions are able to take down a zebra, but it's a dangerous task; zebras defend themselves with lethal kicks that easily break a jaw or leg.

Meerkats have refined keeping a lookout to a dedicated art. While the troop forages for scorpions, insects and lizards, a lone sentinel watches for eagles and jackals. One shrill alarm shriek from the guard and the band rushes for cover.

Baboons live in troops of eight to 200; contrary to popular belief, there is no single dominant male. Social interactions are complex, with males accessing only certain females, males forming alliances to dominate other males, and males caring for unrelated juveniles.

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