IlKhanid and Mozaffarid periods

Vivid art examples of these periods can be observed in some unrivaled masterpieces of the Congregational Mosque (pp90-97); Shaking (pi44), Dar al-Ziyafeh, Dardasht, and Towqchi Minarets {pll3), Mausoleums of Baba Qasem and Sultan Bakht-e Aqa {pi22), and Imamzadeh Jafar {pi20). In the environs of Esfahan, the mausoleum of Pir Bakran {ppl 45-146), Congregational Mosque of Oshtorjan (pl47), Dashti, Aziran, Kaj, and Hafshuyeh Mosques {ppl48-149) belong to these periods.

Maqsud Kashan

Piers of the Sharestan Bridge have survived since the Sasanid period and are the oldest known relics of Esfahan.

Piers of the Sharestan Bridge have survived since the Sasanid period and are the oldest known relics of Esfahan.

During the Sasanid period, the crown princes were sent here to study statecraft. At that time, Esfahan was an important military and strategic site and was ruled by the representative of one of the seven leading Iranian families. Approximately at the same time, Jay became known as Shahrestan ("Township"). Some authorities believe that Jay was not actually a

Timurid and Turkman periods: The remains from these periods include Shahshahan Mausoleum (pll8) and Darb-e Imam (pll9), as well as sections of the Congregational Mosque

Early Safavid period: Early Safavids mostly patronized the "minor" arts (pp64-69). Still several buildings from this period have remained, among them Mausoleums of Harun Velayat (pi 18) and Shah Zeid (pi 19), as well as Ali Mosque (pi08). The portal of the ruined Qotbiyeh Mosque from this period has been transferred to Chehel Sotun (pp84-87). The finest tile mosaics of Shah Tahmasb's reign are in the revetments of the west eivan of the Congregational Mosque (pp90-97).

Shah Abbas I: Shah Abbas's buildings fall fairly into two groups. During the first period (1598-1606), Naqsh-e Jahan Square (pp78-79) and Chahar Bagh Avenue (p62) were laid out, and Ali Qapu (pp80-83), Allahverdi Khan Bridge (ppl27-128), Maqsud Beik Mosque (pl08), Jarchi Mosque (pi09), Mausoleum of Mir Fenderski (ppl24-125), and Mullah Abdollah Madreseh (pi 17) were built. The second part of the program was principally concerned with the completion of the buildings round Naqsh-e Jahan Square - in particular the Imam (Royal) Mosque (pp98-103), and the entrance to the Great Bazaar (ppl34-137). During this period, the most important churches of Julfa (ppl30-133) were also founded.

Shah Safi: Shah Safi was not interested in architecture. However, he completed the structures that had been unfinished after Shah Abbas's death. These include the Imam (Royal) Mosque (pp98-103), Baba Rokn od-Din Shrine (pi24), Imamzadeh Ismail (pi20), and Aqa Nur Mosque

(pi09). During his reign, the churches of Julfa (ppl30-133) were completed.

Shah Abbas II: From this period date Chehel Sotun (pp84-87) and Talar-e Ashraf (p89), Khaju Bridge (ppl 28-129), Hakim Mosque (pl07), Sarutaqi Mosque (pi09) Jadde Bozorg and Jadde Kuchak Madresehs (pi 17), and Shrine of Seti Fatemeh and the Princes (pi23). A great number of royal palaces (Aineh-Khaneh, Sarpushideh, Namakdan, and Haft Dast) were constructed at this time along the banks of the Zayandeh-Rud. They were, however, ruined during the Qajar period.

Shah Soleiman: Shah Soleiman left as his legacy the Hasht Behesht Palace (pp88-89), Lonban Mosque (pl07), Ilchi Mosque (pi 09), Kasegaran Madreseh (pi 17), Mausoleums of Saeb (pi23) and Aqa Hossein Khunsari (pi25).

Shah Sultan Hossein: The largest of Sultan Hossein's structures was the Palace of Farahabad, of which only broken walls remain. The building of the splendid Chahar Bagh Madreseh (ppl 14-116) was founded by Shah's mother. Other structures of this period include Imamzadeh Ahmad (pi21) and Nimavar Madreseh (pi 17), as well as several sections of the Congregational Mosque (pp90-97).

Qajar period: Scarce Qajar projects implemented in Esfahan include Seyed Mosque (pllO), Chahar Bagh-e Qajari Alley (modern Khaju Street), Sadr Madreseh (pll 7), Valeh Tekiyeh (pi24), Mosques of Rahim Khan, Rokn al-Molk, and Hajj Mohammad Jafar Abadei (pill), and Timche-ye Malek in the Great Bazaar (pi34-137). There is a great number of Qajar mansions in Esfahan (ppl38-139), most of which are being restored now.

Soaring high above the city, the Sasanid Fire Temple was perhaps the most conspicious structure of ancient Esfahan.

town, but a fortress that guarded the neighboring town of Qeh. When Qeh was distroyed by the Arabs, people migrated to Jay. Some also say that one of the largest libraries of the ancient world, collected at the order of the half-mythical king Tahmuras, was preserved in the fort of Jay. Attributed to him as well is the construction of the fort itself, along with the Fire Temple. Another district of the original city, Yahudiyeh ("Jewish city"), was founded at a later date some 3.5 km (2 mi) east of Jay. It is most likely that the Sasanid

Soaring high above the city, the Sasanid Fire Temple was perhaps the most conspicious structure of ancient Esfahan.

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