Esfahan

The history of Esfahan's development during the Islamic period is much brighter and more precise. The first unchallenged date is the year 643, when king Yazdgerd I, who had a Jewish wife, allowed a large number of Jews to settle here. Another legend, however, claims that the foundation of Yahudiyeh dates

A tree of life and a winged lion is a repetitive motif of many early-Islamic textiles.

The Jorjir Portal exhibits the exquisite brickwork of the Bvuid period.

The Jorjir Portal exhibits the exquisite brickwork of the Bvuid period.

after the Battle of Nehavand, the city fell to the Umayyads. These were followed by the Abbasid caliphs, who kept control of Esfahan until 931. They made it the capital of the al-Jibal Province of the Abbasid Caliphate.

In the 1 Oth century, Esfahan was governed by petty princes, chiefly from Fars and Iraq; the Ziarids and the Byuids were perhaps the most notable. Mardavij ibn Ziar ruled in the Caspian provinces of Gorgan and Mazanderan. He revolted against the Abbasids and proclaimed the independence of his lands. Having taken advantage of a rebellion in the Samanid army, he seized power in northern Iran and soon expanded his domains as far as Hamadan and Esfahan. Mardavij was particularly famous as a staunch adherent to ancient Persian traditions. The Sedeh Festival {p49), which

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