Whitechapel Bell Foundry

Map p156

@ 7247 2599; www.whitechapelbellfoundry.co .uk; 32-34 Whitechapel Rd E1; tours per person £8; S tours 10am & 2pm Sat, shop 9.30a m-4.15pm Mon-Fri; Aldgate East

The Whitechapel Bell Foundry been standing on this site since 1738, although an earlier foundry nearby is known to have been in business in 1570. Both Big Ben (1858) and the Liberty Bell (1752) in Philadelphia were cast here, and the foundry also cast a new bell for New York City's Trinity Church, damaged in the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001. The IVi-hour guided tours on Saturday (children under 14 years not permitted) offer a revealing insight into a distinguished old trade, but bookings are essential. During weekday trading hours you can view a few small exhibits in the foyer or buy bell-related items from the shop.

WHITECHAPEL ROAD Map P156 Within a few minutes' walk of Whitechapel tube station you'll find the large East London Mosque (46-92 Whitechapel Rd El) and behind it on Fieldgate St the Great Synagogue (1899).

Cable St, just south of Whitechapel Rd, towards Wapping, is where you'll find the former St George's Town Hall building (236 Cable St El), now a library. On the east wall of the

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Tower

See Greenwich & Southeast London Map

Potters Fields

Surrey ■ Water RotherhH

THE EAST END

INFORMATION

Homerton Hospital 1 C1

Royal London Hospital 2 B4

SIGHTS (pp155-59)

East London Mosque 3 A4

Execution Dock 4 B5

Great Synagogue 5 A4

Idea Store 6 B4

Mile End Park 7 C4

Ragged School Museum 8 C4

St George's Town Hall Building...9 B5

St George-in-the-East 10 B5

St Katharine's Dock 11 A5

Sutton House 12 B1

Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park.. 13 D3

Trinity Green Almshouses 14 B4

V&A Museum of Childhood 15 B3

Victoria Park 16 C2

Whitechapel Art Gallery 17 A4

Whitechapel Bell Foundry 18 A4

William Booth Statue (see 14)

Women's Library 19 A4

SHOPPING Q (pp215-34)

Broadway Market 20 B2

Burberry Factory Shop 21 B1

Fabrications (see 20)

Ridley Road Market 22 A1

EATING Q] (pp235-75)

Broadway Market (see 20)

Café Spice Namaste 23 A5

Empress of India 24 C2

Frizzante®City Farm 25 A3

Green Papaya 26 B2

Lahore Kebab House 27 B4

Little Georgia 28 A3

Mangal Ocakbasi 29 A1

Mirch Masala 30 B4

Namo 31 C2

Narrow 32 C5

New Tayyab 33 B4

Ridley Road Market (see 22)

Roman Road Market 34 D3

Santa Maria del Buen Ayre 35 B2

Thai Garden 36 B3

Wapping Food 37 B5

Bistrotheque 38 B2

Blind Beggar 39 B4

Captain Kidd 40 B5

Cat 8. Mutton 41 B2

Dickens Inn 42 A5

Dove Freehouse (see 35)

Grapes 43 C5

Prospect of Whitby 44 B5

Royal Inn on the Park 45 C2

Royal Oak 46 A3

NIGHTLIFE £3 (pp297-310)

Bethnal Green Working Men's

Club 47 B3

Jongleurs Bow 48 C3

Lee Hurst's Backyard Comedy

Club 49 B3

Rhythm Factory 50 A4

ARTS 0 (pp311-21)

Areola Theatre 51 A1

GAY & LESBIAN (pp331-37)

White Swan 52 C4

RCA City

Hotel 53 A4

building facing Library PI is a large mural commemorating the Cable St riots that took place here in October 1936. The British fascist Oswald Mosley led a bunch of his Blackshirt thugs into the area to intimidate the local Jewish population, but they were resoundingly repelled by local people -Jews and non-Jews alike.

You're now also deep in Jack the Ripper territory. In fact, the serial killer's first victim (of five), Mary Ann Nichols, was hacked to death on 31 August 1888 on what is now Durward St, north of (and just behind) Whitechapel tube station.

Along Whitechapel Rd itself, the criminal connections continue through the centuries. Just before the intersection with Cambridge Heath Rd sits the Blind Beggar Pub (@ 7247 6195; 337 Whitechapel Rd), where the notorious gangster Ronnie Kray shot dead George Cornell in 1966, in a turf war over control of the East End's organised crime. He was jailed for life and died in 1995.

After the intersection with Cambridge Heath Rd, this traditionally poor area's history takes a more philanthropic turn, with a statue of William Booth, who established his Salvation Army Christian Mission here in 1865, and the Trinity Green Almshouses, poor-houses built for injured or retired sailors in 1695. The two rows of almshouses run at right angles away from the street, facing a village-type green and chapel.

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